Formative Assessments

All materials were created and shared by Helen Kokkindis  are available for down at the bottom of the page:



FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS


1. Establishing where ALL learners are in their learning

2. Establishing where they are going


3. Establishing how to get there

4. Adjusting instruction based on formative assessment information




Questions to the teacher:


What is the objective of the lesson? (The learning goal)

What do you want the students to know and do?


Is this objective clear to students at the beginning of the lesson?    

(On board: students read aloud; check understanding)


Is the lesson designed backward from the objective/goal?


Have you established success criteria?

What would count as evidence of understanding?.


Do students understand the success criteria (as well as the objective)?

Do you have repertoire of alternative moves or strategies (to support student success) to draw at any given point? *

Do you provide feedback to the student on how to improve and how to go about it? **


_______________________________________________________________________________________________


*  Example: Have students discuss their ideas with others:

Compare your work with Ali and write some advice to another student tackling this topic for the first time.

You seem to be confusing …and… .Talk to Katie about how to work out the difference.


*  *  Feedback: oral or written. Try to avoid scores but if so, not alone…comments must also be provided. Don’t provide answers, use alternative questions for student to seek the answer. No negative words



Effective classroom discussions, questions, activities, and tasks that elicit evidence of students’ learning

  1. Questioning (verbal)

  2. Exit slips

  • Respond to prompts / questions

  1. Quick Write

  2. Short student friendly Rubrics/checklist (learning goals and success criteria must be accessible to the students)

  • Self assessments (Students take an active part in monitoring & regulating their learning)

  • Peer Assessments (pair/ small group - encourages collaboration among students while they are learning


  1. Quick Practical Techniques:

  • Traffic Lights: students flash green, yellow, or red cards to indicate their level of understanding of a concept. (Ask students who have shown green cards to explain concepts to those who have shown yellow or red)

  • Two Stars and a Wish: when students are commenting on the work of one another, they do not give evaluative feedback but instead have to identify two positive features of the work (two “stars”) and one feature that they believe merits further attention (the “wish”) *




_______________________________________________________________________________________________



*  ‘…research shows that the person providing the feedback benefits just as much as the recipi- ent because she or he is forced to internalize the learning in- tentions and success criteria in the context of someone else’s work, which is less emotionally charged than doing it in the context of one’s own work.’



Resources:

Five “Key Strategies”
for Effective Formative Assessment. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 2007




Example of using a Prompt Exit Slip

  1. Before your lesson, determine a key concept that you want students to think about or for which you wish to gather information.

  2. Explain to students that they are going to respond to a prompt posed to the class, which is related to the day’s lesson or information learned.

  3. At the end of your lesson or five minutes before the end of class, distribute the appropriate Exit Slip:

  • printout the prompt

  • state the prompts orally

  • project the prompts visually on an overhead or display board. 

  • distribute notecards

  • have students use notebook paper to record their responses instead of using the printout.

  1. If this is the first time that students have used an Exit Slip, you may wish to model the process and expectations for the students.  

  2. Before students leave the classroom, collect their Exit Slips, and use them to help assess and inform future instruction 


  • Cut and paste student responses onto a class handout.  Copy and distribute to your class the next day.  Use the handout to recap the previous days lesson or ask students to discuss their findings in groups.  The following questions could be posed:

    • Are there comments that you agree with or disagree with?

    • Did someone write something that surprises you, or is there something you hadn’t thought of?

  • Prior to the next session, review all of the students’ Exit Slips to determine how the next class session may need to be structured differently to meet the needs of all learners in your classroom.

  • Exit Slips may be collected as a part of an assessment portfolio for each student to document their growth over a certain topic, unit, or school year.


Note: There are three categories of exit slips (Fisher & Frey, 2004):

  • Prompts that document learning: 
    —Example: Write one thing you learned today. 
    —Example: Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.


  • Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: 
    —Example: I didn't understand… 
    —Example: Write one question you have about today's lesson.


  • Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction: 
    —Example: Did you enjoy working in small groups today?


  • Other exit prompts include: 
    —I would like to learn more about… 
    —Please explain more about… 
    —The thing that surprised me the most today was… 
    —I wish…



Examples: Content area exit slip examples

  • Write one thing you learned today

  • Write one question you have about today's lesson

  • Explain why Canada is not considered a melting pot

  • Draw a quick diagram that shows perspective

  • Of the 3 graphs we studied today which one did you find most useful? Why?

  • Name one positive and one negative thing that happened during group work today


*  Example: Have students discuss their ideas with others:

Compare your work with Ali and write some advice to another student tackling this topic for the first time.

You seem to be confusing …and… .Talk to Katie about how to work out the difference.


*  *  Feedback: oral or written. Try to avoid scores but if so, not alone…comments must also be provided. Don’t provide answers, use alternative questions for student to seek the answer. No negative words



Effective classroom discussions, questions, activities, and tasks that elicit evidence of students’ learning

  1. Questioning (verbal)

  2. Exit slips

  • Respond to prompts / questions

  1. Quick Write

  2. Short student friendly Rubrics/checklist (learning goals and success criteria must be accessible to the students)

  • Self assessments (Students take an active part in monitoring & regulating their learning)

  • Peer Assessments (pair/ small group - encourages collaboration among students while they are learning


  1. Quick Practical Techniques:

  • Traffic Lights: students flash green, yellow, or red cards to indicate their level of understanding of a concept. (Ask students who have shown green cards to explain concepts to those who have shown yellow or red)

  • Two Stars and a Wish: when students are commenting on the work of one another, they do not give evaluative feedback but instead have to identify two positive features of the work (two “stars”) and one feature that they believe merits further attention (the “wish”) *




_______________________________________________________________________________________________



*  ‘…research shows that the person providing the feedback benefits just as much as the recipi- ent because she or he is forced to internalize the learning in- tentions and success criteria in the context of someone else’s work, which is less emotionally charged than doing it in the context of one’s own work.’



Resources:

Five “Key Strategies”
for Effective Formative Assessment. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 2007




Example of using a Prompt Exit Slip

  1. Before your lesson, determine a key concept that you want students to think about or for which you wish to gather information.

  2. Explain to students that they are going to respond to a prompt posed to the class, which is related to the day’s lesson or information learned.

  3. At the end of your lesson or five minutes before the end of class, distribute the appropriate Exit Slip:

  • printout the prompt

  • state the prompts orally

  • project the prompts visually on an overhead or display board. 

  • distribute notecards

  • have students use notebook paper to record their responses instead of using the printout.

  1. If this is the first time that students have used an Exit Slip, you may wish to model the process and expectations for the students.  

  2. Before students leave the classroom, collect their Exit Slips, and use them to help assess and inform future instruction 


  • Cut and paste student responses onto a class handout.  Copy and distribute to your class the next day.  Use the handout to recap the previous days lesson or ask students to discuss their findings in groups.  The following questions could be posed:

    • Are there comments that you agree with or disagree with?

    • Did someone write something that surprises you, or is there something you hadn’t thought of?

  • Prior to the next session, review all of the students’ Exit Slips to determine how the next class session may need to be structured differently to meet the needs of all learners in your classroom.

  • Exit Slips may be collected as a part of an assessment portfolio for each student to document their growth over a certain topic, unit, or school year.



Note: There are three categories of exit slips (Fisher & Frey, 2004):

  • Prompts that document learning: 
    —Example: Write one thing you learned today. 
    —Example: Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.


  • Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: 
    —Example: I didn't understand… 
    —Example: Write one question you have about today's lesson.


  • Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction: 
    —Example: Did you enjoy working in small groups today?


  • Other exit prompts include: 
    —I would like to learn more about… 
    —Please explain more about… 
    —The thing that surprised me the most today was… 
    —I wish…

Examples: Content area exit slip examples

  • Write one thing you learned today

  • Write one question you have about today's lesson

  • Explain why Canada is not considered a melting pot

  • Draw a quick diagram that shows perspective

  • Of the 3 graphs we studied today which one did you find most useful? Why?

  • Name one positive and one negative thing that happened during group work today


*  *  Feedback: oral or written. Try to avoid scores but if so, not alone…comments must also be provided. Don’t provide answers, use alternative questions for student to seek the answer. No negative words



Effective classroom discussions, questions, activities, and tasks that elicit evidence of students’ learning

  1. Questioning (verbal)

  2. Exit slips

  • Respond to prompts / questions

  1. Quick Write

  2. Short student friendly Rubrics/checklist (learning goals and success criteria must be accessible to the students)

  • Self assessments (Students take an active part in monitoring & regulating their learning)

  • Peer Assessments (pair/ small group - encourages collaboration among students while they are learning


  1. Quick Practical Techniques:

  • Traffic Lights: students flash green, yellow, or red cards to indicate their level of understanding of a concept. (Ask students who have shown green cards to explain concepts to those who have shown yellow or red)

  • Two Stars and a Wish: when students are commenting on the work of one another, they do not give evaluative feedback but instead have to identify two positive features of the work (two “stars”) and one feature that they believe merits further attention (the “wish”) *




_______________________________________________________________________________________________



*  ‘…research shows that the person providing the feedback benefits just as much as the recipi- ent because she or he is forced to internalize the learning in- tentions and success criteria in the context of someone else’s work, which is less emotionally charged than doing it in the context of one’s own work.’



Resources:

Five “Key Strategies”
for Effective Formative Assessment. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 2007




Example of using a Prompt Exit Slip

  1. Before your lesson, determine a key concept that you want students to think about or for which you wish to gather information.

  2. Explain to students that they are going to respond to a prompt posed to the class, which is related to the day’s lesson or information learned.

  3. At the end of your lesson or five minutes before the end of class, distribute the appropriate Exit Slip:

  • printout the prompt

  • state the prompts orally

  • project the prompts visually on an overhead or display board. 

  • distribute notecards

  • have students use notebook paper to record their responses instead of using the printout.

  1. If this is the first time that students have used an Exit Slip, you may wish to model the process and expectations for the students.  

  2. Before students leave the classroom, collect their Exit Slips, and use them to help assess and inform future instruction 


  • Cut and paste student responses onto a class handout.  Copy and distribute to your class the next day.  Use the handout to recap the previous days lesson or ask students to discuss their findings in groups.  The following questions could be posed:

    • Are there comments that you agree with or disagree with?

    • Did someone write something that surprises you, or is there something you hadn’t thought of?

  • Prior to the next session, review all of the students’ Exit Slips to determine how the next class session may need to be structured differently to meet the needs of all learners in your classroom.

  • Exit Slips may be collected as a part of an assessment portfolio for each student to document their growth over a certain topic, unit, or school year.



Note: There are three categories of exit slips (Fisher & Frey, 2004):

  • Prompts that document learning: 
    —Example: Write one thing you learned today. 
    —Example: Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.


  • Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: 
    —Example: I didn't understand… 
    —Example: Write one question you have about today's lesson.


  • Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction: 
    —Example: Did you enjoy working in small groups today?


  • Other exit prompts include: 
    —I would like to learn more about… 
    —Please explain more about… 
    —The thing that surprised me the most today was… 
    —I wish…

Examples: Content area exit slip examples

  • Write one thing you learned today

  • Write one question you have about today's lesson

  • Explain why Canada is not considered a melting pot

  • Draw a quick diagram that shows perspective

  • Of the 3 graphs we studied today which one did you find most useful? Why?

  • Name one positive and one negative thing that happened during group work today


Effective classroom discussions, questions, activities, and tasks that elicit evidence of students’ learning

Questioning (verbal)
Exit slips
Respond to prompts / questions
Quick Write
Short student friendly Rubrics/checklist (learning goals and success criteria must be accessible to the students)Self assessments (Students take an active part in monitoring & regulating their learning)Peer Assessments (pair/ small group - encourages collaboration among students while they are learning

Quick Practical Techniques: Traffic Lights: students flash green, yellow, or red cards to indicate their level of understanding of a concept. (Ask students who have shown green cards to explain concepts to those who have shown yellow or red)Two Stars and a Wish: when students are commenting on the work of one another, they do not give evaluative feedback but instead have to identify two positive features of the work (two “stars”) and one feature that they believe merits further attention (the “wish”) *



_______________________________________________________________________________________________



*  ‘…research shows that the person providing the feedback benefits just as much as the recipi- ent because she or he is forced to internalize the learning in- tentions and success criteria in the context of someone else’s work, which is less emotionally charged than doing it in the context of one’s own work.’



Resources:

Five “Key Strategies”
for Effective Formative Assessment. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 2007




Example of using a Prompt Exit Slip

  1. Before your lesson, determine a key concept that you want students to think about or for which you wish to gather information.

  2. Explain to students that they are going to respond to a prompt posed to the class, which is related to the day’s lesson or information learned.

  3. At the end of your lesson or five minutes before the end of class, distribute the appropriate Exit Slip:

  • printout the prompt

  • state the prompts orally

  • project the prompts visually on an overhead or display board. 

  • distribute notecards

  • have students use notebook paper to record their responses instead of using the printout.

  1. If this is the first time that students have used an Exit Slip, you may wish to model the process and expectations for the students.  

  2. Before students leave the classroom, collect their Exit Slips, and use them to help assess and inform future instruction 


  • Cut and paste student responses onto a class handout.  Copy and distribute to your class the next day.  Use the handout to recap the previous days lesson or ask students to discuss their findings in groups.  The following questions could be posed:

    • Are there comments that you agree with or disagree with?

    • Did someone write something that surprises you, or is there something you hadn’t thought of?

  • Prior to the next session, review all of the students’ Exit Slips to determine how the next class session may need to be structured differently to meet the needs of all learners in your classroom.

  • Exit Slips may be collected as a part of an assessment portfolio for each student to document their growth over a certain topic, unit, or school year.



Note: There are three categories of exit slips (Fisher & Frey, 2004):

  • Prompts that document learning: 
    —Example: Write one thing you learned today. 
    —Example: Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.


  • Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: 
    —Example: I didn't understand… 
    —Example: Write one question you have about today's lesson.


  • Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction: 
    —Example: Did you enjoy working in small groups today?


  • Other exit prompts include: 
    —I would like to learn more about… 
    —Please explain more about… 
    —The thing that surprised me the most today was… 
    —I wish…

Examples: Content area exit slip examples

  • Write one thing you learned today

  • Write one question you have about today's lesson

  • Explain why Canada is not considered a melting pot

  • Draw a quick diagram that shows perspective

  • Of the 3 graphs we studied today which one did you find most useful? Why?

  • Name one positive and one negative thing that happened during group work today



_______________________________________________________________________________________________



*  ‘…research shows that the person providing the feedback benefits just as much as the recipi- ent because she or he is forced to internalize the learning in- tentions and success criteria in the context of someone else’s work, which is less emotionally charged than doing it in the context of one’s own work.’



Resources:

Five “Key Strategies”
for Effective Formative Assessment. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 2007




Example of using a Prompt Exit Slip

  1. Before your lesson, determine a key concept that you want students to think about or for which you wish to gather information.

  2. Explain to students that they are going to respond to a prompt posed to the class, which is related to the day’s lesson or information learned.

  3. At the end of your lesson or five minutes before the end of class, distribute the appropriate Exit Slip:

  • printout the prompt

  • state the prompts orally

  • project the prompts visually on an overhead or display board. 

  • distribute notecards

  • have students use notebook paper to record their responses instead of using the printout.

  1. If this is the first time that students have used an Exit Slip, you may wish to model the process and expectations for the students.  

  2. Before students leave the classroom, collect their Exit Slips, and use them to help assess and inform future instruction 


  • Cut and paste student responses onto a class handout.  Copy and distribute to your class the next day.  Use the handout to recap the previous days lesson or ask students to discuss their findings in groups.  The following questions could be posed:

    • Are there comments that you agree with or disagree with?

    • Did someone write something that surprises you, or is there something you hadn’t thought of?

  • Prior to the next session, review all of the students’ Exit Slips to determine how the next class session may need to be structured differently to meet the needs of all learners in your classroom.

  • Exit Slips may be collected as a part of an assessment portfolio for each student to document their growth over a certain topic, unit, or school year.



Note: There are three categories of exit slips (Fisher & Frey, 2004):

  • Prompts that document learning: 
    —Example: Write one thing you learned today. 
    —Example: Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.


  • Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: 
    —Example: I didn't understand… 
    —Example: Write one question you have about today's lesson.


  • Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction: 
    —Example: Did you enjoy working in small groups today?


  • Other exit prompts include: 
    —I would like to learn more about… 
    —Please explain more about… 
    —The thing that surprised me the most today was… 
    —I wish…

Examples: Content area exit slip examples

  • Write one thing you learned today

  • Write one question you have about today's lesson

  • Explain why Canada is not considered a melting pot

  • Draw a quick diagram that shows perspective

  • Of the 3 graphs we studied today which one did you find most useful? Why?

  • Name one positive and one negative thing that happened during group work today


_______________________________________________________________________________________________



*  ‘…research shows that the person providing the feedback benefits just as much as the recipi- ent because she or he is forced to internalize the learning in- tentions and success criteria in the context of someone else’s work, which is less emotionally charged than doing it in the context of one’s own work.’



Resources:

Five “Key Strategies”
for Effective Formative Assessment. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 2007




Example of using a Prompt Exit Slip

Before your lesson, determine a key concept that you want students to think about or for which you wish to gather information.Explain to students that they are going to respond to a prompt posed to the class, which is related to the day’s lesson or information learned.At the end of your lesson or five minutes before the end of class, distribute the appropriate Exit Slip: printout the promptstate the prompts orally project the prompts visually on an overhead or display board.  distribute notecards have students use notebook paper to record their responses instead of using the printout.If this is the first time that students have used an Exit Slip, you may wish to model the process and expectations for the students.  Before students leave the classroom, collect their Exit Slips, and use them to help assess and inform future instruction 

Cut and paste student responses onto a class handout.  Copy and distribute to your class the next day.  Use the handout to recap the previous days lesson or ask students to discuss their findings in groups.  The following questions could be posed:Are there comments that you agree with or disagree with?Did someone write something that surprises you, or is there something you hadn’t thought of?Prior to the next session, review all of the students’ Exit Slips to determine how the next class session may need to be structured differently to meet the needs of all learners in your classroom.Exit Slips may be collected as a part of an assessment portfolio for each student to document their growth over a certain topic, unit, or school year.


Note: There are three categories of exit slips (Fisher & Frey, 2004):

  • Prompts that document learning: 
    —Example: Write one thing you learned today. 
    —Example: Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.


  • Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: 
    —Example: I didn't understand… 
    —Example: Write one question you have about today's lesson.


  • Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction: 
    —Example: Did you enjoy working in small groups today?


  • Other exit prompts include: 
    —I would like to learn more about… 
    —Please explain more about… 
    —The thing that surprised me the most today was… 
    —I wish…

Examples: Content area exit slip examples

  • Write one thing you learned today

  • Write one question you have about today's lesson

  • Explain why Canada is not considered a melting pot

  • Draw a quick diagram that shows perspective

  • Of the 3 graphs we studied today which one did you find most useful? Why?

  • Name one positive and one negative thing that happened during group work today



Note: There are three categories of exit slips (Fisher & Frey, 2004):

  • Prompts that document learning: 
    —Example: Write one thing you learned today. 
    —Example: Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.


  • Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: 
    —Example: I didn't understand… 
    —Example: Write one question you have about today's lesson.


  • Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction: 
    —Example: Did you enjoy working in small groups today?


  • Other exit prompts include: 
    —I would like to learn more about… 
    —Please explain more about… 
    —The thing that surprised me the most today was… 
    —I wish…

Examples: Content area exit slip examples

  • Write one thing you learned today

  • Write one question you have about today's lesson

  • Explain why Canada is not considered a melting pot

  • Draw a quick diagram that shows perspective

  • Of the 3 graphs we studied today which one did you find most useful? Why?

  • Name one positive and one negative thing that happened during group work today


Note: There are three categories of exit slips (Fisher & Frey, 2004):

Prompts that document learning: —Example: Write one thing you learned today. —Example: Discuss how today's lesson could be used in the real world.

Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: —Example: I didn't understand… —Example: Write one question you have about today's lesson.

Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction: —Example: Did you enjoy working in small groups today?

Other exit prompts include: —I would like to learn more about… —Please explain more about… —The thing that surprised me the most today was… —I wish…

Examples: Content area exit slip examples

Write one thing you learned todayWrite one question you have about today's lessonExplain why Canada is not considered a melting potDraw a quick diagram that shows perspectiveOf the 3 graphs we studied today which one did you find most useful? Why?Name one positive and one negative thing that happened during group work today

ĉ
Sebastian Mondrone,
Jan 22, 2014, 11:13 AM
Ċ
Sebastian Mondrone,
Jan 22, 2014, 11:12 AM
ĉ
Sebastian Mondrone,
Jan 22, 2014, 11:11 AM
Ċ
Sebastian Mondrone,
Jan 22, 2014, 11:12 AM
Comments